Episode 39: Alma 18-19 (the drunk episode)

September 25, 2014

Episodes

Click to Listen: Episode 39: Alma 18-19

In this episode David not only started recording after several drinks, but he also played along with the drinking game! So, it is either one of the funniest episodes or the worst one ever, depending on your sense of humor.

Anyway, in this one we have a hot and steamy scene between Ammon and a Lamanite King, and then everyone in the royal palace drops dead, or do they???

“Drink” Count – 24

Exactly 4 Beers

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12 Comments on “Episode 39: Alma 18-19 (the drunk episode)”

  1. Heretic Woman Says:

    You are entertaining when you’re drunk! #sexyvoice 😉

    Reply

  2. Scott Gines Says:

    Funny story about Ammon…

    One of the main anachronisms that is always brought up is the mention of horses in the Book of Mormon, which shouldn’t exist at that time in the Americas. Apologists always cite how bones couldn’t be preserved in the rain forests of Central America… as if bones are the ONLY form of evidence that we would have for horses. Critics would expect to find roads, artwork, well, basically an entire system built around use of the horse. The apologist response: they had horses, but they didn’t use them for travel. They were a food source. Thus we don’t find any artwork, roads, etc.

    These verses with Ammon are used as proof positive for this theory. The verses say that King Lamoni was preparing a great feast and that Ammon was “preparing the horses”. In other words, butchering them for the feast.

    Reply

    • George Nash (@gnash117) Says:

      @Scott I think the Book of Mormon is clear that the horses were used for travel. in Alma 18:9 Ammon was commanded to prepare the kings horses and chariots so he could travel to the land of Nephi. Why mention chariots in connection with horses unless they were used for travel. Seen also in Alma 18:10, 18:12, 20:6. When we get to 3 Nephi the horses are counted as part of the flocks but they still use horses with chariots as stated in 3 Nephi 3:22.

      Saying horses were only used as food does not hold with what is said in the Book of Mormon.

      Reply

  3. Will Roberts Says:

    This was one of the best episodes yet. More drunk episodes!! I will never read the exchange between Ammon and Lamoni ever again. Thank you for enriching my life in this small way, David.

    Adding to what Scott said above, not only were horses mentioned, but chariots were as well. Those Native Americans and their chariots…

    Also, do keep in mind that we are still 90 years before Christ’s birth, yet Jesus is being praised by the queen by name. I guess Native Americans were loved more by Jesus to the point that he revealed his name to them, unlike the prophets of the Old Testament.

    Reply

  4. Bishop Lucy Says:

    Great Episode. Yeah for another named woman! She isn’t brought up much, but on the rare occasions I have heard her name spoken, it was pronounced with a long “a” and rhymed with fish A-bish.

    Reply

  5. Matthew Timion Says:

    I know I’m late to the game, but I have something to add!

    This episode touches on something I feel is VERY overlooked in critical circles. There is a lot of talk of the “great spirit” here.

    paraphrasing:
    Ammon: “Do you believe in God?”
    King Lamoni: “Huh? What’s God?”
    Ammon: “Ya know, the Great Spirit.”
    King Lamoni: “Oh yeah! The Great Spriit!”
    Ammon: “THAT is God!”

    This is important because the idea of a “Great Spirit” is a very American way of discussing the Native American concept of deity. This was, in my opinion, Joseph Smith’s way of showing how the Lamanite people’s concept of God so quickly devolved into the “Great Spirit.” He was not only trying to connect the 19th century concept of Native American deity to the Book of Mormon, but also attempting to show those same Native Americans the ACTUAL origin of their beliefs (ie, the Great Spirit is the Judeo-Christian God).

    If you recall in previous podcasts the Lamanites were described as wearing loincloths, having shaven heads, and painting their faces. Again this was JS’s attempt to show how the Lamanites were in fact that Native Americans.

    Maybe there is a long volume of literature out there comparing these verses with purported beliefs/practices of Native Americans, but I’ve yet to see it.

    Reply

  6. Hal in Howell Says:

    Ammon reminds me of Clint Eastwood’s “Man With No Name” character.

    Reply

  7. J. Reuben Clerk Says:

    The King was murdering servants who allowed his flocks to be scattered. The Lamanites who were trying to scatter the flocks were less pranksters and more accomplices to murder. Ammon was acting in self defense because, if the flocks were scattered, he’d be executed. I have no problem with Ammon’s behavior in this part of the story.

    Reply

  8. Amy Says:

    I loved your sexy voice. It had me in stitches.

    Reply

  9. Molly Says:

    My Drunk Book of Mormon is a delight. Do it again sometime.

    Reply

  10. Tyler Says:

    This episode is too funny! I’m just trying to catch up and this had me laughing out loud! I love how much you get into it!!!!

    Reply

  11. Emily Says:

    The Ammon-Lamoni conversation in sexy voice had me laughing so hard I decided to go back and listen to the whole thing again, and when I did I realized I’d totally missed the “La-moan-i” joke the first time. Dying!

    Reply

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