Episode 32: Alma 5-6

August 25, 2014

Episodes

Click to Listen: Episode 32: Alma 5-6

Alma gets all preachy in this one. He tells everyone about how loving god is, and then explains that they’ll be hacked apart and burned if they don’t believe in him.  Then he tells them that they’re all sheep and better figure out which shepherd to follow, and fast!  This should be nicknamed the “Yea episode”, one chapter alone has 38 Yeas!

“Drink” Count – 43

A little over 7 Beers!

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10 Comments on “Episode 32: Alma 5-6”

  1. Tina Says:

    Re: Alma 5:14. The idea of figuratively receiving Christ’s image in your countenance is a hugely popular catchphrase in Mormonism, made even more popular by an LDS “soft hits” piece from the 1980s…
    His Image in Your Countenance: http://youtu.be/BHLoh5LoiJ4

    Reply

    • Scott Says:

      According to Grant Palmer in “An Insider’s View of Mormon Origins”, this is just one of hundreds of phrases and motifs popular in early 19th century revival sermons that Joseph incorporated into this portion of the BoM.

      Reply

  2. Duke of Earl Grey Says:

    A quick refresher on the people of Zarahemla. We first met them in the Book of Omni, where it says the people of Zarahemla had left Jerusalem at the time Zedekiah was brought into captivity by Babylon. Apparently this was just a few years after Lehi’s group had left Jerusalem, and like Lehi, this group was also “brought by the hand of the Lord” to the promised land. By the time of Mosiah chapter 25, if not earlier, the people of Zarahemla basically have ceased to exist as a separate people, having taken to calling themselves Nephites.

    Just one pronounciation correction, and this time it’s not a name! “Doeth” is apparently the King James English-y way of saying “do” in the third person, so it would be pronounced, “doo-eth”. But if you’d like to keep saying “Doe-eth”, it’s always fun to indulge in Homer Simpson-isms, and I’d support that.

    Reply

    • Fel Says:

      Lehi must’ve been either a lazy or incompetent prophet to completely miss contacting the people of Zarahemla before they left Jerusalem.

      Reply

  3. Roger Says:

    iniquity
    noun
    immoral or grossly unfair behavior

    inequity
    noun
    lack of fairness or justice.

    Both words are probably from the same linguistic route. I guess it would be easy to get confused if you weren’t raised on stories of iniquity.

    Reply

  4. Fel Says:

    I hope you’re not doing a video on Thursday simply because I was confused to the upload schedule. I just assumed that you uploaded a podcast on Monday and Thursday (I just started listening about three weeks ago, so it seemed to be the norm). Don’t burn yourself out. Quality always trumps quantity.

    And do’t worry about chapters being too boring. You’ve already made the Book of Mormon far more entertaining and educational than all my years in Sunday School. I love to hear your thoughts on what you read, since I’ve never heard the thoughts of someone reading this who has no experience with the Book of Mormon and knows little about Mormon lore.

    Reply

  5. rm1258 Says:

    I’ve never before heard them refered to as “the Zarahemla”. The text calls them “the people of Zarahemla”, Zarahemla being the name of their main city and one of their leaders. While I’m nitpicking, it’s the Jaredites, not the Jareds.

    Reply

    • Duke of Earl Grey Says:

      That’s right. There is a shorthand name that Mormons have for the “people of Zarahemla”, a name which is not in the Book of Mormon, but is based on the name of a prominent member of their group. But since the book hasn’t dropped that name, I probably shouldn’t say it?

      Reply

  6. rm1258 Says:

    I’ve never before heard them revered to as the Zarahemla. The text refers to them as the people of Zarahemla, Zarahemla being their main city and one of their leaders. While I’m nitpicking, it’s the Jaredites not the Jareds.

    Reply

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