King Follett Discourse, It Begins

March 2, 2019

Episodes

King Follett Discourse, It Begins

King Follett died in 1844 when a bucket of rocks fell on his head while he was helping dig a well. Joseph Smith spoke at his funeral, for hours, and 4+ people wrote notes of his speech. Let’s read it!

 

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The church’s official information is here

Read along with us at boap.org

 

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FBM 7: Reign of Judges – Title of Liberty

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One Comment on “King Follett Discourse, It Begins”

  1. Jeff Says:

    Yay (drink), my comment made it on the podcast! I’ll cross it off my bucket list!

    The King Follett discourse is so interesting, not just for what it is, but what it represents: the deeper doctrine that some people obsess over, convinced that Joseph already knew all the secrets of the universe and was just dying to get it all out to the church, had they been more faithful or something. In practice, you’d be in a Sunday School class talking about something simple and there’d be that one high priest that’d start, “Well, there’s a section of the King Follett discourse that sheds some light on this…” and half the class would marvel at the wondrous doctrines that are deep within this (and other similar things like the Book of Abraham) that can be ferreted out. The other half of the class, of course, would take the opportunity to sneak in a five-minute nap until said high priest was done preaching his folk doctrine.

    Really, this talk and others like it are more important in the church for what they represent than for what they are: the mysteries of the universe, only available in this religion, only unlockable if you live worthy enough to have the spirit of discernment/revelation/whatever to truly understand the deeper meaning behind these words. If you ever wondered how the church manages to hold onto intellectuals, this is one big shiny carrot to dangle in front of them and hold their attention so they never start thinking (or even want to start thinking) about doctrinal discrepancies or contradictions or any of the things that make exMos out of most of us.

    Reply

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