Episode 66: 3 Nephi 13-15

February 8, 2015

Episodes

Click to Listen: Episode 66: 3 Nephi 13-15

If you’ve read the New Testament of the Bible, then I’m afraid there isn’t very much in this one in the way of new material. However, with his second stop on his world tour, Jesus does make a few tweaks to his act so you’d better be paying attention! And then Jesus teaches us that we should never ask god for anything (especially not food, water, or clothes), and then later he tells us that all we need to do is ask god and we will receive… So yeah, who knows?

“Drink” Count – 14 (this includes the 9 Verily’s)

Just a little over 2 beers (weak!)

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And don’t forget to vote for the show for The 2014 Brodie Awards! As a reminder, the show has been nominated in two categories:

Best LDS-Interest Audio/Video Channel” and,

Best Scripture Study Blog/Podcast

And huge thanks in advance!!!

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4 Comments on “Episode 66: 3 Nephi 13-15”

  1. Scott Gines Says:

    Interesting tidbit…

    Joseph Smith set about re-writing the Bible, because, ya know, it has been translated incorrectly and wicked men had tampered with it, etc. So, if you buy a “Mormon” KJV Bible, the regular text is plain ol’ King James, BUT there are occasional footnotes where Joseph Smith got revelation from God about what the Bible SHOULD say. Mormons call this the Joseph Smith Translation or JST.

    Now, if you read 3rd Nephi 13:9-13, it is an almost exact copy of the KJV Matthew 6:9-15.

    After the BoM was published and Joseph Smith started working on the JST, he added a re-translation for Matthew 6:9-15.

    Rather puzzling how the Book of Mormon, the “Most correct book on Earth”, got the wrong translation of that passage.

    Reply

    • Duke of Earl Grey Says:

      It’s especially funny that David Michael should point out “Judge not, that ye be not judged” as a good tenet of Christianity (if only people actually followed it), because the JST of Matthew 7:1 says, “Judge not unrighteously, that ye be not judged: but judge righteous judgment.” Surely you didn’t really think Jesus meant that super-righteous people were unequipped to harshly judge their sinful neighbors? Thank you, Joseph Smith Translation!

      Reply

  2. Tina Says:

    I’m a little late to reply to this episode, but I enjoyed that David brought up the question “Why pray at all?” It’s a question for the ages. God already knows what you need. You’re not supposed to ask directly b/c that would imply that you know what you need more than God. Kinda perplexing.

    I’m sure I wasn’t alone in having been taught the important thing isn’t whether or not you get what you want; it’s whether or not you were humble enough to subject your will to God’s. It actually reminds me of the Arabic phrase, “Insha’Allah” (i.e., “if God wills it”). So a prayer ought to go along these lines: “Dear God, Thanks for everything you’ve already done for me. I know that you already know everything that is fit for me to receive. I hope that my desires are in line with your perfect will. I’ll take whatever you deem fit. Thou art great and good. In the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.”

    As David noted, Mormon prayer is a very specific type of prayer, generally patterned after the Lord’s prayer. Just meditating about your interconnectedness with the rest of life on this planet while taking a Sunday hike doesn’t really count as “prayer” in a traditional Mormon sense.

    Re: lilies of the field. I think this imagery was more popular in the 60s and 70s when “Hippie Jesus” was in vogue, a la “Jesus Christ, Superstar.” Don’t worry about material things. God will provide. On a semi-related note, if you like old movies, it’s worth checking out Sidney Poitier’s Best Actor Oscar-winning performance in a movie of the same name. Also, this MoTab song is popular among LDS choirs: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDFBBbhwmfk

    Reply

  3. SeedsOfDoubt Says:

    When Jesus speaks ‘verily’, so shall ye DRINK!

    Reply

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